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Guy Nirpaz Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer
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Often featured in: customerthink.com, business2community.com, and insidesap.com.au
Guy Nirpaz Recent News Mentions
customerthink.com Nov. 22, 2019
Years One Through Four: How To Advance And Elevate The CCO Role
As the chief customer officer (CCO) of the organization, you may at times feel like you’re begging for people to listen to you, to understand your goals, and to implement your suggestions. This is an important role for the growth of your organization, and you will need the help of your C-Suite team, especially the CEO, in order to gain real traction in your work. As you get acquainted with the five competencies and how they come together, your role will evolve as you implement the competencies through the phases of the Customer Experience Maturity Map . Years one through three are what I call the “disruption and blocking and tackling years.” Embedding competencies into the organization to focus and work together will disrupt deeply rooted silo-based operations and leadership. Successful CCOs Deliberately Build a Plan of Action People know how to achieve results within their silo walls. The CCO’s role and direction will challenge silo-based work. It’s their role to move the organization in unison to improve customers’ lives, which will disrupt definitions and metrics for success, work implementation, and organizational habits. Successful chief customer officers deliberately build a plan of action in the early years to include uniting leadership actions and behavior, advancing from silo-based to one-company focus, embedding actions or competencies to achieve greater results, and enabling employee performance. I recently spoke with Guy Nirpaz , CEO and Founder of Totango about this path to organizational and customer success on my podcast. We agreed that when the CCO and CEO come together to create unity across the whole organization, it’s easier for everyone to see that there’s one common goal, and that’s to meet customer goals. “Early years” of the work can mean the span of years one through three, depending on the size and complexity of the organization and the ability to effect change. If it happens to take a little longer than three years, don’t feel dis
customerthink.com Nov. 22, 2019
Years One Through Four: How To Advance And Elevate The CCO Role
As the chief customer officer (CCO) of the organization, you may at times feel like you’re begging for people to listen to you, to understand your goals, and to implement your suggestions. This is an important role for the growth of your organization, and you will need the help of your C-Suite team, especially the CEO, in order to gain real traction in your work. As you get acquainted with the five competencies and how they come together, your role will evolve as you implement the competencies through the phases of the Customer Experience Maturity Map . Years one through three are what I call the “disruption and blocking and tackling years.” Embedding competencies into the organization to focus and work together will disrupt deeply rooted silo-based operations and leadership. Successful CCOs Deliberately Build a Plan of Action People know how to achieve results within their silo walls. The CCO’s role and direction will challenge silo-based work. It’s their role to move the organization in unison to improve customers’ lives, which will disrupt definitions and metrics for success, work implementation, and organizational habits. Successful chief customer officers deliberately build a plan of action in the early years to include uniting leadership actions and behavior, advancing from silo-based to one-company focus, embedding actions or competencies to achieve greater results, and enabling employee performance. I recently spoke with Guy Nirpaz , CEO and Founder of Totango about this path to organizational and customer success on my podcast. We agreed that when the CCO and CEO come together to create unity across the whole organization, it’s easier for everyone to see that there’s one common goal, and that’s to meet customer goals. “Early years” of the work can mean the span of years one through three, depending on the size and complexity of the organization and the ability to effect change. If it happens to take a little longer than three years, don’t feel dis
customerthink.com Nov. 15, 2019
How To Achieve Company-Wide Customer Success With Guy Nirpaz
Customer success is more than just a buzzword, and Guy Nirpaz , the CEO and founder of Totango , and author of Farm Don’t Hunt: The Definitive Guide to Customer Success , talks to us about how to realistically integrate customer success into customer experience. In today’s episode, Guy talks about the importance of delivering value to the customer and across the entire customer lifecycle. It’s about understanding that you need to create lifetime value that goes beyond the number of transactions had with a customer. Totango is a customer success software that helps enterprises drive revenue growth and reduce churn while focusing on the SaaS customer journey. Align Products, Services, and Behaviors to Customer-Centered Growth Guy explains that customer success is about starting with your customers’ goals. Incorporate the achievement of their goals to your Key Performance Indicators. When you focus on customer success, you need to have a customer-centered growth strategy. You can’t start with your goals and try to have your customers adapt to them. According to Guy, the biggest challenge when it comes to a customer-centered growth strategy is translating it into business operations. He shares that businesses need to create a customer-centered model. This means that leaders think through how to improve retention, expansion, and customer loyalty. These actions have to be agreed upon, company-wide. Guy makes a great point by stating that there needs to be alignment with products, services, training and executive leadership, and long-term metrics. You will need to fight through the “over promise and under deliver” challenges that can lead to disappointment in early implementations. Remove the Hero Mentality Leaders need to understand that customer success is a business initiative. Guy shares that you need to remove the “hero mentality.” It’s not about one person or department caring about customers more than another. There’s no ownership of the customer; ever
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Totango Recent News Mentions
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